In bridge, a Chinese finesse is a "pseudo", or fake, finesse:

Dummy
A5
WestEast
K643 JT92
South
SQ87


In this layout, South is in hand and has decided that West likely has the SK. The normal play of a spade to the dummy's ace, followed by a spade toward the queen, will therefore fail. So South tries a Chinese finesse instead.

The SQ is led from hand. West might duck out of fear of blowing a trick if the actual layout is:

Dummy
A5
WestEast
K643 9872
South
SQJT


As another example:

Dummy
K53
WestEast
Q86 AT97
South
HJ42


South is on lead and needs a heart trick. This is impossible double-dummy, but a Chinese finesse might work. South can lead the HJ toward dummy, intending to play low if West fails to cover. From West's perspective, the layout might be:

Dummy
K53
WestEast
Q86 9742
South
HAJT


In that case, West must duck to leave South guessing the whereabouts of the HQ.

See also

  • Backward Finesse
    A finesse that's taken in the "opposite" direction of a regular finesse.

  • Double Finesse
    A finesse against two opposing honor cards.

  • Intra-Finesse
    A type of finesse against three opposing honor cards.

  • Marked Finesse
    A finesse made obvious by the auction or play of the hand.

  • Obligatory Finesse
    A type of ducking play that finesses an opposing honor.

  • Ruffing Finesse
    A finesse for an enemy card (usually an honor) by threat of a ruff.

  • Simple Finesse
    A finesse for a card (usually an honor) held by the opponents.

  • Triple Finesse
    A finesse against three opposing honor cards.

  • Two-Way Finesse
    A card combination in which either defender can be finessed for a queen.

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