A criss-cross squeeze is a variation of the simple squeeze. Declarer squeezes a single opponent while holding threat cards in both in hand and dummy.

In this layout, declarer can cash the diamond ace to squeeze West in the black suits.

Dummy
Q2
--
West6East
K4A5
--632
--South--
K9SA--
H--
DA
CQ8


Declarer has a club menace in hand and a spade menace in dummy. The criss-cross squeeze is so named because a spade discard by West allows declarer to cash the SA and cross to dummy via a club to cash the SQ. If West elects to pitch a club instead, then South crosses to dummy's CA and returns to hand with a spade to collect his CQ.


Example

From David Bird's "Bridge Squeezes for Everyone"1:

Dummy
AK5
972
WestKJ4East
T963Q953Q82
85KJT643
9763SouthT82
842SJ747
HAQ
DAQ5
CAKJT6


"East opens a weak 2H and - trying to impress the kibitzers - you reach an ambitious 7C. West leads the H8 and you win with the queen. What chance can you see of thirteen tricks?

"Unless the spade queen falls in two rounds, you will have to squeeze East in the major suits. He is certain to hold the sole guard on dummy's H9. You must hope that he holds the spade queen, too. A simple squeeze cannot work, because East is sitting over the major-suit lengths in dummy. Only a criss-cross squeeze will be good enough. You cash your winners in the minor suits, arriving at this end position:

Dummy
AK5
97
West--East
T963--Q82
5KJ
--South--
--SJ74--
HA
D--
CT


"You lead the last club and throw the S5 from dummy. Whichever major suit East unguards, you will be able to disentangle your extra trick."


References

1 Bird, David (2002). Bridge Squeezes for Everyone.

See also

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