Namyats is a convention for opening the bidding at the 4-level. Specifically, it's used to distinguish weak and strong 4/ opening bids.


Opener's Bids

  • 4: Artificial, showing 7+ strong hearts and 8-9 tricks. Example: AJ KQJT9432 KQ 3

  • 4: Artificial, showing 7+ strong spades and 8-9 tricks. Example: AKQT876 K5 A2 63

  • 4: Artificial, showing 7+ hearts and 7-8 tricks. Weaker than 4. Example: 98 AQT87532 A J3

  • 4: Artificial, showing 7+ spades and 7-8 tricks. Weaker than 4. Example: AKJ65432 Q32 J T

Note that other opening bids are also possible with related hands:

  • 1/: natural. Used when the hand is too weak to open at the 4-level (e.g. only a 5-card major suit).
  • 2: playing Standard American methods, this is strong and artificial. Used when the hand is too strong to open a Namyats 4/.
  • 2/: playing Standard American methods, these bids are weak two-bids - preemptive.
  • 3/: playing Standard American methods, these bids are also preemptive.


Responder's Bids

In response to 4:

  • 4: Artificial relay, showing slam interest in hearts. Opener is expected to clarify his hand.
  • 4: Signoff, showing no interest in slam. Opener is expected to pass.
  • 4: Natural, showing a big one-suited hand in spades. Very rare. Not forcing.


In response to 4:

  • 4: Artificial relay, showing slam interest in spades. Opener is expected to clarify his hand.
  • 4: Signoff, showing no interest in slam. Opener is expected to pass.


In response to any 4-level opening bid:

Responder may make a conventional reply like 4NT Blackwood, 5NT Grand Slam Force, etc. These responses are based on partnership agreement.


Opener's Rebids

There are many flavors of Namyats used after a 4/ relay. The simplest approach is:

  • After a 4/ relay from responder, a 4/ bid by opener is a natural signoff.
  • All other bids are natural or follow partnership agreements (e.g. cue bids, 4NT Blackwood, etc.).


In Competition

Typically, a double by the opponents of 4/ either shows, respectively:

  • clubs or diamonds, OR
  • a takeout double of opener's suit (hearts or spades)

For the latter, a redouble indicates general high-card values with interest in penalizing the opponents. It implies lack of support for partner's suit.

Conventional Namyats responses over a double are still on.

Responder's bids are natural over any overcall.


Examples

OpenerResponder
AKJT9872S3
HA9KQJ873
DJT98
CK5643

Opener
4 (1)
Pass

Responder
4 (2)

  1. 4 shows 7+ strong spades and 8-9 tricks.
  2. 4 is a signoff.


OpenerResponder
62SKT5
HAKJT9875Q63
DJKQT3
CK5AJT

Opener
4 (1)
4 (3)

Responder
4 (2)
Pass

  1. 4 shows 7+ strong hearts and 8-9 tricks.
  2. 4 is a relay. With 15 HCP and heart support, responder is interested in slam.
  3. 4 indicates a minimum. Opener only has 8 winners (7.5 hearts, 0.5 clubs).


OpenerResponder
A9SKQ5
HAKJ98742Q63
DJKQT3
CK5AJT

Opener
4 (1)
4 (3)
5 (5)
Pass

Responder
4 (2)
4NT(4)
6 (6)

  1. 4 shows 7+ strong hearts and 8-9 tricks.
  2. 4 is a relay. With 17 HCP and heart support, responder is clearly interested in slam.
  3. 4 is a cuebid. With approximately 9 winners (1 spade, 7.5 hearts, 0.5 clubs), opener is willing to go beyond 4 to probe for slam.
  4. 4NT is Blackwood, asking for aces.
  5. 5 shows two aces.
  6. 6 is a signoff.


Origins

Namyats is "Stayman" spelled backwards. It was invented by Victor Mitchell, who was Sam Stayman's bridge partner in the mid-20th century. Both players dominated the American bridge scene during their era.

See also

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